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Posts tagged ‘Force and Motion’

Adding to 10

In the beginning of our homeschooling endeavor, the Lord told me to really focus in on Science and Social Studies and that Math and Language Arts would naturally happen.  I didn’t truly understand what that meant, but I have learned to trust the Lord when I have heard Him so clearly.

For our social studies focus, I put together a unit on US Symbols (click here).  Science was a four week study of Force and Motion, which I purchased from teacherspayteachers.comwith a two week focus at the end on gravity and magnets (click here).

Math was a little more interesting.

I have ended up simply teaching to the standards.  Mason has always been very good at addition and so we have been focusing on making the “adding to 10” facts second nature.  Instead of thinking about them and having to “add them up”, I want him to be able to see them and know them immediately.

The following are the steps we used to explore these combinations of 10.  I left them as steps so that you can combine them in whatever timing works best for you.  Steps typed in the same color are what we did on the same day.

Step 1:

  • Using a ten frame chart and double-sided counters, I asked Mason to find all the different combinations that added to 10.  I showed him one example (1 red, 9 yellow) so that he understood how to use the two colors to show the equation.
  • As he found the different combinations, we used our washable Dry Erase Markers to write them on our “white board” (a page protector with a piece of white cardstock).
    • I labeled the “white board” at the top with an R + Y = 10, just to throw some algebra connections in there.
    • As we got to the end, he really started using the recorded combinations to see what he might have missed.
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Ten Frame

Step 2:

  • Do a short mini-lesson on combinations that add to 10.  I used this fabulous “Rainbow to 10 lesson” found at A Cupcake for the Teacher.  It is a wonderful visual to help students remember all of the combinations that will add to 10.  We don’t have a large whiteboard or easel paper, so we used our Window Markers and back door!  We left the information on the door all week so he could refer back to it as needed.

Step 3:

  • Continuing with the “Rainbow to 10 lesson” materials, Mason colored and filled out the blank Rainbow to 10 worksheet.  This was great to begin to solidify these math facts, moving from concrete manipulatives to number representation.
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Rainbow to 10

Step 4:

  • Using the Combinations of 10 worksheet I created, Mason used dot markers to show all the facts that add to 10 (as well as a bonus question to begin thinking of the number 20).
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Combinations of 10

Step 5:

  • We played a fun Ten Frame game over at Mrs. Ricca’s Kindergarten blog.  Again we used the dot markers, but crayons/markers/colored pencils work just as well.  I printed two or three sheets and he had a blast.
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Ten Frame Toss

Step 6:

Step 7:

  • We ended with a set of flashcards.  I developed this set specifically to be both a practice tool as well as an informal assessment.  I wanted to see how familiar and second nature these facts of 10 had become, so I created the flashcards with half “add to 10” facts and half other simple addition facts.
  • As an assessment tool, I held up the cards so that I could monitor the speed and fluency at which he knew the “add to 10” facts.

I listed steps that can all be done separately or combined to create longer lessons.  Every learner is different and will be able to accomplish a different amount of learning in one setting.  Feel free to use each step as needed.

Questions?  Feel free to comment below or email at thelearningleaf.mail@gmail.com

 

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Science Session 1

Science…not my favorite.

That may be an unfair statement. As a child, I was never really interested in science class, but I was always asking my Dad questions about the world, be it nature, mathematics, computers, etc.  Looking back this is more science than I realized.  The ability to formulate questions,  test those questions, and find answers is science – from there you have scientific topics.  However, they are all based on asking questions, testing, and finding answers about the world around us.  Therefore, I believe we are all “into” science at some point – whether it be physical science, life science, or social science.  We are all constantly observing that which is around us in the world and trying to make sense of it and the intricate interactions that happen every second of every day.

Now, curriculum…

As mentioned in the previous post, Dream and Provision, I am not always the most frugal.  However, I also understand that finding those freebie gems and discounted goodies is a wonderful thing.  And so, my first science unit came from a discounted science bundle (I believe through educents.com).  It was a bundle that came with four or five separate science units.  One of which is a Kindergarten/1st grade level unit on Force and Motion by Christina DeCarbo.

Forces and Motion snap

Click the Pic to Preview

I have organized our lessons into a weekly focus and then also into lessons for the day.  This way I can follow the days in succession even if we get a little “flowy” with the week schedule.  We are planning on three days of science a week.  The following list is an abbreviated version of what we are doing throughout the week. If you are interested in the daily, more detailed notes comment on this post or email me at thelearningleaf.mail@gmail.com.  I have not gone into detail on some of the activities in order to honor copyright of the unit purchased.  All I can say, is that I believe it is a very worthwhile investment.

Week One – Motion, Force, Push/Pull, Directions

  • define motion, force, push/pull, direction (spread out throughout the week)
  • Play “Red Light, Green Light”, but use the wording “At Rest, In Motion”
  • Push/Pull several objects around the house, observe and record what happens with each object
  • Go to the playground to see what equipment requires pushing or pulling
  • Go outside and have students exhibit different directions an object can move (i.e. zig-zag, diagonal, circular, straight, etc)

Week Two – Energy, Work, Friction, Roll/Slide

  • Experiment with several household items, (hot wheels, paper clips, a small box, etc), to see which items roll and which items slide.
  • Ramp Fun to focus on the subject of energy.  Build ramps (using books and a ruler or something the like) and experiment with different height ramps to see the differences in how far the object goes.
  • Define friction, use ramps with different surfaces to explore the concept of friction (wood ruler, sandpaper covered ramp, towel over the ramp, etc)

Week Three – Motion/Forces Review

  • “Motion Mania Mission” – an activity from the Froces and Motions unit mentioned above – several small quick activities to revisit the concepts of motion, force, push/pull, direction, energy, work, friction, roll/slide
  • Motion Memory – cards with pictures representing these concepts, cards are placed face down and the standard “concentration game” is played to find matches.
  • Push/Pull website – click here to view
  • Balloon Rockets – a fun activity to experience the “pushing force” of thrust.

Week Four – Assessment and Gravity

  • Push/Pull assessment – pretty informal to see what has been retained (included in unit)
  • Introduction to Gravity – video of astronaut Chris Hadfield – this video is of making a peanut butter sandwich in space.  If you go to YouTube and search for “Canadian astronaut”, you will find many different fun videos of Chris in space.
  • Gravity Art – a fun marble and canvas art with a focus on gravity in as much as the marble rolls down because it is always being pulled to the earth.
  • Gravity Art II – Ramp Racing Art , again focusing on the force that is pulling the cars toward the earth
  • Play with water balloons throwing them and watching for the point that the force of gravity begins to overcome the pushing force from your arm.

Week Five – Magnets

  •  Defying Gravity Shoe Box trick – (showing that gravity is a force that can be worked against by other forces)
  • Sensory bin – I am using a rubbermaid box filled with rice and objects that are both magnetic and non-magnetic, they will record that which is magnetic.
  • “House Hunting” – will explore the house with magnets to see what is magnetic (staying away from computers, phones, tablets, etc).  I will actually give the kids a camera to take pics of the magnetic and non-magnetic objects to place on this magnet mobile.
  • explore magnets attracting and repelling
  • use a Filing Viewer to observe the difference in the magnetic field when magnets attract and when they repel.

Week Six – Magnets

  • Magnet races – using magnets on top of table controlled by magnet under table to complete a course.
  • Magnet art – I will probably use a thin cardboard box, unless I can find some plexiglass in the garage!
  • Inspector Magnet – from the Magnet Mini Unit by Casey Dawson
  • Magnet Mini Book – which I will create closer to time and then post a link here!

 Extra Resources:

  • Motion/Force Children’s Books –
  1. Motion: Push and Pull, Fast and Slow
  2. Push and Pull (Rookie Read-About Science)
  3. Move It!: Motion, Forces, and You (Primary Physical Science)
  4. What is Friction (Rookie Read-About Science)
  5. And Everyone Shouted, “Pull” : A First Look at Forces and Motion
  • Gravity/Magnet Children’s Books –
  1. Gravity is a Mystery
  2. Magnets:  Pulling Together, Pushing Apart (Amazing Science)
  3. What Magnets Can Do (Rookie Read-About Science)

And now, Social Studies…

 

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