Growing Every Day

Posts tagged ‘addition’

Adding to 10

In the beginning of our homeschooling endeavor, the Lord told me to really focus in on Science and Social Studies and that Math and Language Arts would naturally happen.  I didn’t truly understand what that meant, but I have learned to trust the Lord when I have heard Him so clearly.

For our social studies focus, I put together a unit on US Symbols (click here).  Science was a four week study of Force and Motion, which I purchased from teacherspayteachers.comwith a two week focus at the end on gravity and magnets (click here).

Math was a little more interesting.

I have ended up simply teaching to the standards.  Mason has always been very good at addition and so we have been focusing on making the “adding to 10” facts second nature.  Instead of thinking about them and having to “add them up”, I want him to be able to see them and know them immediately.

The following are the steps we used to explore these combinations of 10.  I left them as steps so that you can combine them in whatever timing works best for you.  Steps typed in the same color are what we did on the same day.

Step 1:

  • Using a ten frame chart and double-sided counters, I asked Mason to find all the different combinations that added to 10.  I showed him one example (1 red, 9 yellow) so that he understood how to use the two colors to show the equation.
  • As he found the different combinations, we used our washable Dry Erase Markers to write them on our “white board” (a page protector with a piece of white cardstock).
    • I labeled the “white board” at the top with an R + Y = 10, just to throw some algebra connections in there.
    • As we got to the end, he really started using the recorded combinations to see what he might have missed.
20140814_134424

Ten Frame

Step 2:

  • Do a short mini-lesson on combinations that add to 10.  I used this fabulous “Rainbow to 10 lesson” found at A Cupcake for the Teacher.  It is a wonderful visual to help students remember all of the combinations that will add to 10.  We don’t have a large whiteboard or easel paper, so we used our Window Markers and back door!  We left the information on the door all week so he could refer back to it as needed.

Step 3:

  • Continuing with the “Rainbow to 10 lesson” materials, Mason colored and filled out the blank Rainbow to 10 worksheet.  This was great to begin to solidify these math facts, moving from concrete manipulatives to number representation.
20140814_134904 - Copy

Rainbow to 10

Step 4:

  • Using the Combinations of 10 worksheet I created, Mason used dot markers to show all the facts that add to 10 (as well as a bonus question to begin thinking of the number 20).
20140814_140126

Combinations of 10

Step 5:

  • We played a fun Ten Frame game over at Mrs. Ricca’s Kindergarten blog.  Again we used the dot markers, but crayons/markers/colored pencils work just as well.  I printed two or three sheets and he had a blast.
20140814_140702

Ten Frame Toss

Step 6:

Step 7:

  • We ended with a set of flashcards.  I developed this set specifically to be both a practice tool as well as an informal assessment.  I wanted to see how familiar and second nature these facts of 10 had become, so I created the flashcards with half “add to 10” facts and half other simple addition facts.
  • As an assessment tool, I held up the cards so that I could monitor the speed and fluency at which he knew the “add to 10” facts.

I listed steps that can all be done separately or combined to create longer lessons.  Every learner is different and will be able to accomplish a different amount of learning in one setting.  Feel free to use each step as needed.

Questions?  Feel free to comment below or email at thelearningleaf.mail@gmail.com

 

Comfort Zone

A trend is developing in our lessons.  

I find it easy and natural to quickly prepare math and language arts lessons, two areas in which I feel comfortable and confident.  I have seen this trend developing for a few weeks now, but didn’t give it much thought.  Armed with this observation, I am going to challenge myself to bring in a few more science and social studies based activities (areas I do not gravitate to naturally).

The coming of Fall is lending me a helping hand in this area.  One of our kindergarten standards in science is to describe characteristics of the four seasons.  So, we have already done a lot of talking about the Fall – change of weather, leaves changing color, leaves falling, wearing jackets, etc.  I downloaded a cute Fall pack from www.servingjoyfully.com.  It is a great resource of really cute activities.

all about fall image

In printing out and using this Fall pack, I made note that many of the activities were review for Mason (4 yrs).  However, more pages than I expected would interest Madison (2 yrs).  This is a great shift for all of us, I simply need to expand my searching in regards to lessons for Mason, and begin making a more conscious effort to think of activities on Madison’s level.

Week-in-Review

Math:  

Basic Facts Addition Practice – Addition Blackout

  • Write the numbers 2-12 on a piece of paper.  Roll two dice and add the numbers showing.  Cover up or mark off the number on your sheet that matches the sum rolled.  The first person to cover or mark off all the answers wins.

Basic Facts Addition Practice – Addition Bingo

  • We used the portion of the game that focuses on addition facts 1s – 5s.  The answers are on the BINGO cards, and the question cards have simple addition questions such as 1 + 4.

bingo copy

Reading: 

Sight Word Practice

  • Mason used the PowerPoint for Dolch sight words, Kindergarten List 1.  More details about the list and download option, here.

(K)List1 image

  • We then made a sight word “parking lot” to match the words on this new list.  Below is an example parking lot picture, but not the one that actually matches the (K)List 1 words.  Click here for more details on the “parking lot”.

Sight Word parking

Science:

Season Characteristics – Fall Trees

  • I went on a search for cut-and-paste activities, and this Fall Leaves download came across my path.  It is so simple and perfect.  As the kiddos are cutting and glueing, it gives a great opportunity to discuss fall characteristics such as leaves changing and falling, weather growing colder and more rainy, etc.  Not to mention, I absolutely loved seeing the artwork side of things, and how differently their pictures turned out.

MandM fall trees

Love at First Sight

Love at first sight – sight words that is.

Using the Dolch sight word lists found hereI created a Power Point presentation for each.  All I wanted was a presentation that showed the word, and then a simple sentence using that word in context.  My goal was to create sentences that Mason could read, either with words he already knew, or words that could be inferred through the picture displayed.

My initial thought had simply been to sit down at the computer and go through the slideshow with Mason.  Standing by the television one evening, it dawned on me…show the lesson on the tv.  So, I hooked up the computer to show on the big screen and voila, Mason’s lesson large as life in our living room!  He thought this was amazing and devoured List 1.  The next day, I prepared List 2 and he devoured that as well.  I could tell the fact that his work was on the big tv screen was exciting.  The next day, he complained because we simply reviewed List 1.

This led me to create Lists 3 and 4.

We then moved to the next level of technology…a presentation clicker.  From my days in public teaching, I had a presentation clicker to use with my Power Point presentations.  This device allows you to change the slide remotely.  I showed Mason how the clicker worked, and now he was able to practice the word lists at his own pace.  Oh the power of technology.  I cannot tell you how many times he went back and forth through the lists, reading the words and sentences.  Then again, of course, one list was not enough…he wanted to use the clicker more with different words.

By all means, go for it!

These Power Point presentations have been such a blessing to our hosuehold, we want to share them with you.  Please note, these are labeled as PreK lists.  Sight words are really not grade specific and each child advances in their own unique timing.  There will be more lists and presentations to come for additional Dolch sight words.

list example

Click below to download each list:

  • List 1 – and, for, a can, make, me, my, not, red, run
  • List 2 – it, in, here, I, help, go, jump, little, is, funny
  • List 3 – blue, come, big, down, away, find, play, look, one, said
  • List 4 – see, the, three, to, two, up, we, where, yellow, you
  • Please note, these lists may be downloaded and housed on your personal or school computer.  It may be used with individual students, collaborative learning groups, or classrooms.  Please feel free to adapt the words, sentences, or images if needed.  Do not sell this or any part of the template.  Do not directly link to the PowerPoint file, if placing on a blog, please give credit and a link to this blog post.  If sharing the file with others, please direct them to this blog post to download.  Thank you!

Week-in-Review

Math:  

Basic Facts Addition Practice – Addition Blackout

  • Write the numbers 2-12 on a piece of paper.  Roll two dice and add the numbers showing.  Cover up or mark off the number on your sheet that matches the sum rolled.  The first person to cover or mark off all the answers wins.

Reading: 

Sight Word Practice

  • Mason’s reading has really been progressing recently, so I thought it would be good to begin to add to his sight words.  Using the Dolch sight words, I created the PowerPoints discussed above.  Each Power Point presentation is comprised of 10 sight words and a sentence to accompany each of the words, as well as a list review slide at the end.  This could be a great way to do a spelling list if desired.

Library Time

  • We went to the library and Mason requested a specific book.  This was an excellent opportunity to show him the book identification letters and how to find a book on the shelf.  Very teachable moment that turned into a wonderful life lesson.

The New

This was a week of new things.

In my many Google searches for educational resources, lapbooks keep coming to the forefront.  For those who aren’t familiar with such things, it seems that lapbooks are file folder games on steroids!  They are one or more folders folded and glued in such a way to create a book of activities that kids can complete and/or revisit time and time again.  They can house informational booklets, pictures, word searches, mazes, small games and activities.  You name it, and it can likely be housed in a lapbook.

With that, I thought what a great way to introduce a new topic.  Once I had decided this is what I wanted to do, I found a fun free lapbook, downloaded it and got stuck.  All of a sudden, it was overwhelming to see all the information that was in the lapbook, as well as the explanations of how to build the thing.  It was too much.  So after several days, I decided to simply do one of the activities that looked fun and useful from the math lapbook I had downloaded.

This is when I realized the key.

You don’t have to (and probably aren’t supposed to) complete the whole lapbook and then present it to the child!  You do the activities and then secure them in the lapbook as you go, a way to organize and store them.  Wow.  So simple, and yet very revelatory for me!  So the week before last we did a math BINGO game and this week a basic addition game, which both made it into our math lapbook.

This past week our family started the celebration of Feast of Tabernacles which continues through part of this week.  Being our first themed “unit” of such, we placed our activities into a Feast of Tabernacles lapbook.  Most of our lessons this week revolved around learning the history of the Israelites journey from Egypt to the Promised Land, as well as why we celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:33-43) – to celebrate that the Lord dwells or “tabernacles” within us through Holy Spirit, as He did with the Israelites in the wilderness, Solomon’s temple, and as He dwelt with us through the person Jesus.

Feast of Tabernacles activities/lapbook (so far):

  • Day 1 – build a sukkah (tent, or temporary dwelling) – This was much fun and we used it as a time to discuss the word sukkah and its meaning both as a simple vocabulary lesson, as well as how it tied into how the Israelites lived during their transition time to the Promised Land.

IMG_1311

  • Day 2 – coloring sheet and activity of how the Israelites camped around the tabernacle – I found a black and white image online and printed it for the kids to color (I would share, but I didn’t find any license and/or copyright terms.).  Then I created a fun matching activity to learn where each of the twelve tribes camped around the tabernacle.  Mason really liked this.  We first tried to match it from the coloring page, but the angle didn’t work so well.  This led to tweaking the final product which you can download below, which includes the first letters of each of the tribes – helping Mason match the tribes to where they camped.  We secured the coloring sheet and the Israelite camp activity into a lapbook.  I also made a small pocket to secure into the lapbook in which we could keep the tribe pieces.

day2

(click to download Israelite camp puzzle and tot version)

  • Day 3 – read and discuss the “God Tabernacles With Us” booklet – This is a simple flip booklet that we attached to our lapbook.  We used it to discuss how the presence of God first dwelt with the Israelites, “God’s People”, in the tabernacle, and then temple, then Jesus, then within us through Holy Spirit.

fot booklet

(click to download booklet)

  • Day 4 – Feast of Tabernacle word tracing – I created a sheet of tracing words that pertain to the Feast of Tabernacles.  I cut the side off a page protector and glued it to the back of the lapbook.  This way Mason can trace them over and over again.  We discussed each word as he wrote it.

fot tracing

(click to download word list)

  • Day 5 – look at a map showing the route of the Exodus – I found a map that was simple enough to not get bogged down in details (or unknown details).  We traced the map with our fingers, discussed the parting of the Red Sea with Moses, Mt. Sinai, and the parting of the Jordan River with Joshua (actually the priests as they stepped into the river).  We also discussed map facts such as how to tell land from water, and you could easily add in north, south, east, west, legends, etc.

These are the actual days lessons we have completed.  I am thinking that the next couple of lessons will be looking at and discussing Solomon’s temple, and discussing Jesus’ birth (which may well have been at the time of Feast of Tabernacles).  Pics of our fun:

Week-in-Review (other than the above unit!)

Math:  

Basic Facts Addition Practice – Addition Blackout

  • Write the numbers 2-12 on a piece of paper.  Roll two dice and add the numbers showing.  Cover up or mark off the number on your sheet that matches the sum rolled.  The first person to cover or mark off all the answers wins.

Introduction to 3-digit numbers – impromptu

  • I noticed Mason was playing a lot of games that involved three digit numbers, so we began to stop and work on how to say the numbers correctly when they appeared – wii sports game scores, Monopoly, numbers in the car such as speed and our gas milage (destination to empty) display.  This will likely turn into a more focused lesson this week.

Number Quantity

  • This was for Madison (2yrs), but Mason found it fun as well.  I numbered the places in an egg carton from 1-12.  Then, the correct number of beads are to be placed in each space.  It was difficult to get the beads out of the egg carton, so we used measuring spoons.  The kids thought this was a blast and the beads soon became “ice creams”, and they were scooping ice cream into and out of the carton!

sensory duo

Reading: 

Sight Word Practice

  • Mason’s reading has really been progressing recently, so I thought it would be good to begin to add to his sight words.  Using the Dolch sight words, I created a PowerPoint.  Each Power Point presentation is comprised of 10 sight words and a sentence to accompany each of the words.  This could be a great way to do a spelling list if desired.
  • I hooked the computer to display on our TV and Mason thought it was the greatest!  I will definitely be creating more of these Power Point presentations in the near future.

two slides

click to download List 1 and List 2

Just Do It

I have recently found myself caught up in a whirlwind of stuff.  There are so many free activities, lessons, units, etc.  This is a good problem.  However, I find myself looking for…

the next best thing 

I have a difficult time settling on an activity because what if the next link I click is the perfect one!  This week I have been brought back to a place of just do it.  We are definitely not short of time at the moment.  So, without wasting our time, I can do that great activity I found AND we can still do the “perfect” activity if it happens to be a click away.

As an example, I had downloaded a “limited time” free addition activity.  I wasn’t completely sure if Mason would like it or not.  Finally, I decided to just do it.  It was time to stop deliberating and decide to move forward.  He loved it!  It was an addition bingo game that is part of an addition and subtraction lapbook designed by Cyndi Kinney at knowledgeboxcentral.com.  He played it 3 or 4 nights in a row.  It was something he could do with me during the day, as well as sharing a game with Daddy after dinner.  It was amazing.  Throughout the week, Mason did over one hundred basic addition facts simply by playing BINGO.

bingo copy

Much of the uncertainty comes down to the fact that I have never before walked this road called homeschooling.  After ten years of teaching, I knew my curriculum.  I knew the “best practices” of teaching middle schoolers.  I knew the type of activities that really worked, and those that were big flops.  What I am having to remind myself is that I didn’t learn that overnight.   And so I am reminded and comforted with:

Whether you turn to the right or to the left, your ears will hear a voice behind you, saying, “This is the way; walk in it.” – Isaiah 30:21

There is grace on this journey.  Mistakes are lessons in learning.  We, as a family, get to learn together in the complete grace of the Lord.  Blessings.

Week-in-Review

Math:  

Basic Facts Addition Practice – Bingo

  • This is the activity described above.  We used the portion of the game that focuses on addition facts 1s – 5s.  The answers are on the BINGO cards, and the question cards have simple addition questions such as 1 + 4.  This is ultimately part of an addition and subtraction lapbook, that we will be putting together as we complete each activity.

Handwriting:

Tracing Letters

  • We are still making our way through the learning workbooks that have come at birthdays and Christmas and such.  Mason did a few more of these alphabet pages.

Disney alphabet book copy

Reading: 

Audio Book

  • I have been wanting an audio book for Mason to follow.  Not finding any I liked at the library, we happened across the CD that accompanies his children’s Bible.  He sat and followed along better than I expected.

Story Sequencing

  • Using the Blue’s Clues story sequencing cards (that I purchased in college!), Madison “sorted” the cards for him, while Mason put the four part stories in the proper sequence.
  • This was a great sorting activity for Madison.  She loves to find ways to be a part of it!

sequencing

Sight Word Practice

  • Mason’s reading has really been progressing recently, so I thought it would be good to begin to add to his sight words.  Using the Dolch sight words, I created a PowerPoint.  Each Power Point presentation is comprised of 10 sight words and a sentence to accompany each of the words.  This could be a great way to do a spelling list if desired.
  • I hooked the computer to display on our TV and Mason thought it was the greatest!  I will definitely be creating more of these Power Point presentations in the near future.

two slides

click to download List 1 and List 2

Word Fishing

  • From cardstock, I cut out eighteen 3″x4″ cards.  I drew six pictures that were ‘S’ words (snake, sock, etc), six pictures that were ‘M’ words, and six pictures that were ‘D’ words.  I then put a paper clip on each card and put them on the floor in a “pond”.  I attached a string and magnet to a pencil for both Mason and Madison – creating “fishing poles”.
  • Then the fishing began!  The objective was to first catch all the ‘S’ words.  If one was caught that was not an ‘S’ word, he would have to throw it back.  They both loved this activity as well!

Arts/Crafts:

Foil ‘Sun’ 

  • Mason is very interested in the sun, moon, stars, planets, space etc.  So as an art project, found in Alphabet Art by Judy Press, I cut out the letters s-u-n and several rectangles of foil.
  • Mason glued the foil to the letters and we will hang it as a mobile in his room.
  • There was also a flavor of Spelling to this.  I placed the letters on the table (out of order, stacked on top of each other) and asked Mason what word he could make.

sun

Day-by-Day

Keeping it honest here,

I will have to say that I did not put much effort into a focus of “schooling” last week.  In preparation to write this post, I started to reflect on last week and realized – I don’t remember a whole lot about it!  You know those weeks, where you just live it.  You walk through it and press on.  I love how the Lord prevails and toward the end of the week, I was able to come out from under the fog.

Last week, I decided that it would be fun to work within a theme of the Sun.  I did a little searching online, but as the last post stated sometimes there is just Too Much Help to wade through on the internet.  There are many units out there about the solar system, but not many just focusing on the sun.  I was having a hard time even knowing where to begin or what to do.  We did a craft or two, but it was a sensory activity that helped move me forward.

We poured out a good amount of regular table salt onto a cookie sheet (saw this on the web).  Mason enjoyed this and started writing his name, letters, and such.  Then I had the idea – the Sun theme.  I asked him to draw a sun.  Then I asked him to write a word that described the sun… he wrote ‘hot’.  Yes! I had a feeling I was onto something here.  He continued to come up with words to describe the sun.  Wow, a spelling activity within the theme of the Sun.  No striving, just flowing.

salt letters

There is a small part of me that wants to have a beautiful, complete, out-of-this-world (pun intended!) unit put together.  Yet, I know this is not needed, nor do I have the extra time in life right now to create one up front.  In the meantime, we will walk day by day exploring our sun, moon, stars, comets…

What activities would you suggest for a Sun theme?

Week-in-Review

Math:  

Counting Practice

  • While cleaning our utility room, I found a roll of Thomas the Tank Engine stickers.  Mason thought they were amazing and quickly stretched them as far as they would go on the couch.  Seizing the opportunity, I asked him to count them.

Recognizing Patterns

  • With the roll of Thomas stickers, there were over 30 on the roll.  I noticed there was a pattern every six stickers.  I asked Mason to find the pattern.
  • I also asked him how he knew the pattern was starting over.  I want to better understand how he is recognizing patterns.

stickers1

Basic Addition, Crayola Pad

  • A sheet of basic addition problems, purchased at Wal-Mart.

Crayola practice pad

Science:

  • We created a Solar System mobile.  This was a mixture of several activities that I had seen from an art book Adventures in Art by Susan Milord, and two other crafts online.  The mobile was a spiral mobile.  We made a circle of cardstock and stapled it together for the top – we used yellow paper to represent the sun.  The planets hang down each one a little bit farther to represent the distance that each planet is away from the sun.  I chose to use a smaller hole punch so that we could simply knot the ribbon behind the hole.  This was a fun way to work on the order of the planets.  Also, a great way to revisit the order time and time again.

planet mobile

Sensory Activity: 

Salt Letters (mentioned in post above)

  • We place a good amount of salt on a cookie sheet – Mason then went about drawing pictures, as well as letters, numbers, his name, etc.
  • I also classified this as a Spelling activity since he started writing words describing the sun.

And again, Mason worked on his calendar activities from RoyalBaloo.com throughout the week which covers some Handwriting, and Math – graphing, shapes, number awareness.

desk

Too Much Help

With the start of public school, I have been seeing many Facebook posts and emails regarding going back to school, supplies on sale, curriculum discounts.  I have had two reactions to this:

1)  A complete joy because of the freedom we have in not being tied to that schedule – AND –

2)  An extreme pressure toward finding a whole or partial curriculum.

I will preface this with saying, there is absolutely nothing wrong with pre-made curriculums.  Coming from a background of ten years teaching in the public schools, I am a fan of certain curriculums and not others.  I can see where specific curriculums work better in a private or home setting vs a public school setting, or for one student personality vs another student personality.  I get all of this.  What I have realized this week is the venture to find a curriculum when the Lord has told you not to is a bit futile!

I also discovered that walking this homeschooling journey is akin to parenting in general.  When I had my first child, I thought the internet would be my best friend.

Google to the rescue!!!  

Um…no.  With all the wealth of information out there, I quickly discovered that there was too much information out there.  Breastfeed vs formula, cry-it-out vs never cry, spanking vs not, cloth diaper vs disposable…you name it, the arguments are there.  All sides are right, all sides are wrong.  I quickly found my head swirling and my eyes shedding many-a-tear because I was worse off after my two hour search!

4 years into parenting and another child later, I finally came to understand.  When searching the internet all those times, I would end up searching for an opinion that already matched mine and it made me feel better about what it was that I already had a leading to do anyway!  Parenting is being me, with the Lord, training my children up as we go.  If I’m really not sure, I’m going to ask the Lord, or another person who is walking this journey with me and slightly ahead of me.

This same thing goes with homeschooling.  There are as many ways to homeschool as there are unique and individual families.  What is right for one is not automatically right for the next.  Some may be and look similar, some may look completely different, but they will all have their own flavor…as they should.  So I walk on, being my own flavor with the Lord.  I know the Lord has told me it is not time to purchase any curriculum, but to follow the leading of Mason and his interests.

My encouragement to you in your journey, be it life or homeschooling or fill-in-the-blank:  If you are following the true desire of your heart, don’t give up.  Stand on what you know is right, and walk on.  Today you may feel overwhelmed, tired, and stretched, but joy comes in the morning.  Each day is His and therefore, each day is yours.

Live it, Love it, Joy in it, Learn.

Week-in-Review

Math:  

Measuring in centimeters

  • My children love to empty my center desk drawer of all its pens, pencils, erasers, binder clips etc.  This time Mason had placed most everything from the drawer on the kitchen table.  This included a ruler that had cm on one side.  My husband explained how to line an object on the zero and find its length.  Mason spent the next 15-20 minutes measuring items from the drawer.

Lego Block Addition and Subtraction, Lego pack

  • Several months ago, I came across a free Lego pack by www.walkingbytheway.com.  Two of the pages included were addition and subtraction of blocks.  We spent most of our time doing the subtraction.  You place an amount of Lego bricks on the card, let them count, and then take some away while their eyes are closed.  The student then has to tell you how many you took away.  We made sure to restate the problem after each time “Six take away two equals four.”  This will really help when we are ready to move to writing these type of problems using symbolic form.

lego math

Reading:  

Matching Partner Letters (Uppercase to Lowercase), Alphabet Cards by The Learning Leaf

  • This was a fun review game.  It is the age old game of concentration using Uppercase and Lowercase letters.  I made a set of alphabet cards and we placed a 4 x 4 block of cards on the table (8 letters of the alphabet at a time).  Mason would turn over two, trying to match the uppercase letter with its partner lowercase letter.

alpha cards

(Click the pic for a free set of printable cards.)

  • Madison (age 2) was very interested in the alphabet cards, so I made a tot-pack for her.  I made templates with the Upper and Lowercase matches on them.  I placed two templates in front of her (4 letters at a time), and she had to match the alphabet card to the correct letter on the templates.  An example of Madison’s templates:

alpha tot

(Click the pic for a free download of the tot-pack templates.)

Word Family Practice, Starfall.com

  • We did 15-20 minutes on starfall.com working on word family reading, recognition, and spelling.  I saw him work on the -an, -at, -en, -it word families, but there may have been more!  If you have never used starfall.com, jump over and take a look, it is a wonderful free online tool.

Starfall screen

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